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Site and Content © Fred Herrmann unless specified. 
“Galactic Cascade”  The Draco Trio of Galaxies. 
M57, a collaborative effort by Fred Herrmann and Terry Hancock produced this ultra deep image of the Ring planetary nebula 2,300 light-years distant in the constellation Lyra.
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“Like a cosmic flower blooming amongst the stars, the colorful and famous Trifid nebula is captured in this image”  Link to National Geographic August 9th, 2013  Space.com “Behold, the Dumbbell Nebula! Stargazers Flex Cosmic Muscle with Amazing Photo”  Article released.  Link to Space.com Article
October 2013
News
M57 Deep Exposure image showing outer hydrogen envelope published in Astronomy magazine.  Link to Astronomy Magazine
October 2013
The Rosette shown to the upper right was selected as National Geographics Editors favorite and best space image of the week.  Link to National Geographic Article
August 16th, 2013
M27 aka The "Dumbbell" nebula is a planetary nebula 1,300 light years distant in the constellation Vulpecula.  This deep image portraying the outer hydrogen envelope was done with the use of elemental filters in the Sii, Ha and Oiii spectrums. 
A collaborative effort by Fred Herrmann and Terry Hancock produced this ultra deep image of the Medusa planetary nebula 1,500 light-years distant in the constellation Gemini.
This is a Bi-Color image of M27, The Dumbbell Nebula as shown on StellarEyes.com. 
A collaborative effort by Fred Herrmann, Terry Hancock and Andre van der Hoeven consisting of over 40 hours worth of collective data produced this image of the Dumbbell .
“A Stellar Explosion: The Dumbbell Nebula” image was published on the StellarEyes.com website.  Link to StellarEyes.com
July 23rd, 2013
“A Celestial Dumbbell and a Dying Star” was published by National Geopgraphic.  Link to National Geographic
July 13th, 2013
“A New View of the Dumbbell Nebula”, Published by The One Minute Astronomer.  “An astonishing new view of M27, the famous Dumbbell Nebula”  Link to Article on OneMinuteAstronomer
July 12th, 2013
Medusa Nebula published in July 2013 issue of Sky and Telescope  Link to Sky and Telescope Magazine
July 2013
“Medusa Nebula” was published by National Geopgraphic.  Link to National Geographic
August 30th, 2013
Sagittarius Quartet  “Anything but Tranquil”..  Astronomy Image of the day.  Link to Astronomy Magazine
September 2013
Sagittarius Quartet as shown in Astronomy Magazine 
M8 “Trifid” Three in one Nebula as shown in National Geographic
“Galactic Cascade” image published in Sky & Telescope.  Also known as the Draco galaxy trio.  Link to Sky and Telescope Magazine
October 2013
“The nebula featured in this beautiful image is officially catalogued as Messier 17 and NGC 6618, but it is called many different names, including the Swan Nebula, the Horseshoe Nebula, the Lobster Nebula and the Omega Nebula.”  Link to Space.com Article
October 10th, 2013
M17 Omega Nebula as pictured on Space.com
“The Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237-9/46) lies in the constellation Monoceros the Unicorn. Interestingly, the first thing you’ll see when you point a telescope in this region is open cluster NGC 2244, which lies at the heart of the nebula.”  Link to Astronomy Magazine
October 17th, 2013
“Broom with a View!” featured on Space.com  Link to Space.com Article
October 31st, 2013
Witches Broom as pictured on Space.com
“A Witch’s Broom for Halloween” featured on Astronomy Magazine.  Link to Astronomy Magazine
October 31st, 2013
Witch’s Broom as shown on Astronomy Magazine
Rosette as shown in Astronomy Magazines APOD
“Boo! Here’s a great shot of the Witch Head nebula.”    Link to Universe Today Article
October 31st, 2013
Witches Head as seen on Universe Today
“The unwinking eye of the Helix Nebula, or Eye of God, burns brightly in this striking October 29 photograph”    Link to National Geographic Article
November 1st, 2013
“Eye of God” nebula as seen in National Geographic
Link to Astronomy Magazine
November 6th,  2013
“The Jellyfish Nebula (IC 443) is a supernova remnant in the constellation Gemini the Twins.”  selected by Astronomy Magazine as their APOD
November 20th, 2013
“The Jelly” Astronomy Magazines Astronomy Image of the Day
“Deep into the Helix.”    Link to Astronomy Magazine
“Deep into the Helix.”
Link to Space.com Arricle
December 16th,  2013
“Three’s Company in Space”
June 19th, 2013
“Spectacular Tarantula Nebula”    Link to Space.com Article
“Tarantula Nebula as seen on Space.com”
Draco Galaxy Trio as seen on Space.com
Link to Sky and Telescope
December 20th,  2013
“A colorful Rose”
March 2014 Sky and Telescope
“Christmas Tree Nebula Shines for the Season”    Link to National Geographic Article
“Christmas Tree Nebula as seen on National Geographic”
Rosette Nebula as seen in Sky and Telescope Magazine 
February 14th,  2014
Perseus Double Cluster
“Young stars burst from a crescent-shaped cradle in the constellation Carina”  Link to National Geographic Article
“Gem Cluster as seen on National Geographic”
April 2014 Sky and Telescope
“Perseus Double Cluster as seen in Sky and Telescope Magazine”
March 7th Astonomy Magazine APOD
Whirlpool Galaxy Picked by National Geographic
“Great nebula in Orion as shown on Astronomy Magazines APOD”  Link to Astronomy Magazine
“M42 Astronomy Magazine APOD March 7th, 2014”
March 7th 2014 National Geographic
Whirlpool Galaxy picked by National Geographic as one of this weeks best space images.
March 28th,  2014 Astronomy.com
Spider Nebula as seen in the May 2014 issue of Astronomy Magazine
“Statue of Liberty” nebula, Astronomy Magazines Picture of the Day
“Statue of Liberty Nebula on Astronomy.com”
May 2014 Astronomy Magazine
Spider nebula in the May issue of Astronomy Magazine
March 28th, 2014  National Geographic
On Astrophotography Interview video in National Geographic
Gamma Cassiopeia as seen in National Geographic
Gamma Cassiopeia in National Geographic
April 10th, 2014 National Geographic
An attempt to explain astrophotography in 100 words or less!.
April 18th, 2014  National Geographic
M17 Omega Nebula as seen on Astronomy
Warped Galaxy as seen in National Geographic
Warped Galaxy  in National Geographic
April 30th, 2014 Astronomy Magazine
Omega Nebula as seen in Astronomy Magazines APOD
May 9th, 2014  National Geographic
The “Panther” picked as Astronomy magazines APOD 5/12/2014
“Starlight Brightens Cosmic Cloud” as seen on National Geographic
Star Birth in Puppis
May 12th, 2014 Astronomy Magazine
The Panther as Astronomy’s APOD
Astronomy Magazine July 2014
The Peacock Globular Cluster on National Geographic
The Southern Seagull Nebula as seen in the July 2014 issue of Astronomy Magazine.
Southern Seagull
National Geographic May 30th, 2014
The Peacock Cluster on National Geographic
Astronomy Magazine August 2014
Globular Cluster NGC3201 in Sky and Telescope Magazine.
Galaxy Centaurus A as seen in the August 2014 issue of Astronomy Magazine.
Centaurus A
Sky & Telescope Magazine Sept, 2014
NGC3201 in Sky and Telescope Magazine
NASA Friends from MSFC Visiting the Owl Mountain Observatory
Top Left:  Fred and Jerry Fishman (Winner of the 2011 Shaw Prize (aka. Asian Nobel Prize) Bot Left:  Fred and the Planewave 14” CDK Right:  Planewave 14”, STXL and AOX